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  1. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/May06Post.mp4 Back when I was in high school, I ran cross country. And even before that, I was an avid jogger. And I used to play these tricks on myself when I was out running. One of them was when I turned up my street, and only had a hundred yards left, I would play mind games on myself. I would pretend that I was running to the end of my street. But my house was only halfway up. This would give me some mental energy to push all the way through. This was to counter a habit I'd had of slowing into the finish line.
  2. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Apr23Post.mp4 One very common, and very dangerous fallacy is the "set and forget" idea. This is possible in some areas, but not others. For example, you learn to tie your shoes and you're done. A few rounds of trial and error, figure it out and you're good. Riding a bike, driving a car, making a peanut butter sandwich. All these are skill that are EASY to put into the level of unconscious competence. But many other skills are not so easy. Cooking, for example, you can continue to learn as long as you live. There are
  3. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Apr12Post.mp4 You'll find feedback loops everywhere. Most of them are hard to predict. More of a general structure. The bigger the system is, the harder it is to predict. Like weather patterns, for example. A huge system with inter-dependent variables. One gigantic feedback system. Impossible to predict. This is why they can only give percentages when talking about rain. But from inside your own head? It's easy. Since you don't NEED to predict anything. You just need to have a direction. Not
  4. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Dec18Post.mp4 Nearly all humans have the same basic intentions. We want to operate within the world to get what we want and need. We want some kind of vocation that rewards us for our skills. Skills we can continue to learn. Skills we feel are an expression of our nature. The ideal rewards for these skills are not only money, but recognition. The ideal situation is to present your skills to the world. And have them recognized as skills few others have. And because of that, you get money and genuine validation and re
  5. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Nov19PostA.mp4 A sense of humor is something that people are said to "have." What, specifically, does this mean? George Lakoff, a student of Noam Chomsky, theorizes that we use verbs and prepositions to describe how we think about intangible nouns. For example, consider the idea that you are "in" a relationship. A relationship is an intangible noun. Another name for the word relationship is it is nominalization. A noun created from a process verb. To relate to somebody. The noun, "relationship" is created from th
  6. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Oct02Post.mp4 Imagine there was some kind of nuclear apocalypse. Or cannibal apocalypse if you like. Society ended, and most people died. Now imagine it's 1000 or so years later, and a new society has emerged. They've discovered a bunch of stuff from the old society. A few musical instruments, and some CD's of people playing these instruments. Since the CD's are really rare, only super rich people can listen to them. But there is an idea of something called "music" floating around. This really weird way of making so
  7. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Sept01Post.mp4 Humans are kind of like chainsaws. Chainsaws only operate at very high RPM's. At low RPM's, they kind of rumble and sputter. But rev 'em up, and their purr like a kitten. A kitten that can chew through trees like crazy. Humans are KIND OF like that. Meaning we were designed to operate BEST under certain conditions. What conditions? A lot of external pressures. External motivating forces. These operate how we feel SUBCONSCIOSLY. Not rationally. For example, imagine you had a fantast
  8. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug27Post.mp4 In banking, they have something called "duration mismatch." When people make deposits, they can take them out at any time. These are called "demand deposits." But when banks lend out money, then lend the money for longer, fixed periods. Which means that on one side, they have, say $1,000,000 in deposits. These are deposits that could, theoretically, be withdrawn at any time. But that same money is lent out, but in fixed terms. Car loans, house loans, etc. These are for much longer periods. Theoret
  9. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug25Post.mp4 For some things, practicing is easy. Very, very boring, but easy. Playing the guitar for example. Many people would LIKE to be able to play. But few people do. The reason is pretty simple. We humans won't do anything unless we believe the benefits will be greater than the costs. You might imagine being to hang out somewhere, strum a few chords and get plenty of positive attention. That imagination would be the benefits. And so long as the costs were vague, it would be a fairly strong desire.
  10. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/July5Loop.mp4 The idea of free will kind of squishy. On one hand, it's pretty much the cornerstone of western society. In both religion and law. According to Christian tradition, the ONE THING we have, that nobody, not even the devil, can take away is our free will. Our decision to choose. Similarly, if you did something wrong, and you have to face a judge and jury, it's VERY HARD to convince them that somebody else MADE you do it. Even wives that kill husbands after years of abuse have a hard time getting off, UNLESS they ki
  11. Most people have heard about the four levels of learning. Unconscious incompetence, when you don't know you suck. Conscious incompetence, when you know that you suck. Conscious competence, when you don't suck, but you've got to use all your brain power to not suck. Then unconscious competence, where you can do it fairly well without needing to think. Many things that we learn come through these four categories. Tying your shoes, writing, driving, riding a bicycle, making a burrito. But there are some skills we come pre-programmed with. Like communication
  12. One of Cialdini's important laws is called "Commitment and Consistency." It's kind of complex how it works, especially from a persuasion standpoint. It's the idea behind sales funnels. You buy a product for $3. Then you buy another product for $19 from the same place. Then you buy another one for $49. Sales funnels use this PLUS scarcity. Each additional sales is a "one time offer." So they are combining TWO of Cialdini's laws. The law of Commitment and Consistency (you already bought one, so one more is consistent) and Scarcity (one time offer)..
  13. Our language, and our world, is more filled with metaphors than we realize. Problems happen when we mistake metaphor for reality. So long as we are using metaphors to talk ABOUT something, they're fine. But if we are trying to use metaphors as guiding principles, that's when we run into trouble. The red car idea is a common way to describe our filters. How we separate the important stuff from all the noise. For example, somebody doesn't notice all the red cars. Then they buy a red car. Then they suddenly notice all the red cars. Before, they didn't
  14. https://mindpersuasion.com/beliefchange/
  15. When I was a kid I used to play golf. My friends and I would play at this nine hole course next to our junior high school. I had some hand-me-down clubs, and it was only $5 to play. One hole gave me problems. We had to hit over the water. Seeing the water always messed me up. Then another kid gave me some fantastic advice. Advice that I keep playing in my mind whenever I need it. And that was to pretend the water was green grass. To negatively hallucinate the obstacle. So I could see and focus on the objective beyond it. Of course, he didn
  16. If you learn something that's helpful in one context, it's sometimes not so helpful in another context. Once my friend talked me into going snowboarding. I had done a lot of skateboarding when I was younger. I mistakenly assumed they would be similar. It took me a long time to get from the top to the bottom. Even though it LOOKED the same, it was completely different. Very rarely will you get a professional athlete that is skilled in more than one sport. Plenty of us have baggage from childhood. We "learn" certain things that are helpful in certain conte
  17. Having the wrong metaphor can ruin everything. Most everything we perceive is done through metaphors. Our brains have only evolved to really make sense of macro physics. Apples falling from trees, etc. But our brains are also capable of creating and interpreting hallucinations as if they are real. This is how we come up with mythology and other incredible stories. All from looking up at the sky and imagining that the stars are people. As soon as we imagine they are people, we start making up stories about how they interact. Used "correctly" these stories
  18. Very often, something that feels good in the short term can add up to long term pain. It feels good to sleep in every day, and it sucks to get up at the crack of dawn. But it's easy to imagine how sleeping in EVERY DAY can slowly destroy your productivity. While on the other hand, getting up at the crack of dawn will tend to INCREASE your productivity. Similarly, food that tastes REALLY GOOD tends to add up. The better it tastes, and the quicker it tastes better, the worse it generally is for you. On the other hand, food that is healthy tends to be things you have
  19. One of the reasons economics is called the “dismal science” is because of the idea of opportunity costs. If you’ve got ten bucks in your pocket, you can buy whatever you can get for ten bucks. Whatever you decide to buy, when you hand over that ten bucks, that’s the direct cost. The opportunity costs are all the things you CAN’T buy once you make your decision. Say you’re in fast food land. And you decide to buy a gigantic carne asada burrito combo with your ten bucks. The opportunity costs are all the things you CAN’T buy once you decide on the burrito. Nach
  20. They say a directionless arrow never misses its target. Meaning if you just randomly shoot an arrow without choosing a target, you can’t miss. On the other hand, if you shoot an arrow at a target, you most definitely CAN miss. Why would you want to shoot an arrow without aiming at anything? Maybe it’s fun. Maybe you like to watch the arrow sail through the air. Maybe you like to imagine your an archer in an ancient battle. None of those guys really aimed. They just sort of picked and angle and hoped for the best. With a bunch of archers on one side
  21. In sports, a common saying is “leave it on the field.” Which means when you play a big game, you put in 100% effort. So when the game is over, you’ve given everything. This is a fantastic idea for sports. The problem with metaphors like this is when they are misapplied. For example, let’s say you wanted to walk across the room and talk to somebody. The “leave everything on the field” approach isn’t so appropriate. When you’re playing sports, especially an important game, winning is the ONLY thing. (Except maybe for little league...) Any team that lo
  22. Being able to deliberately hallucinate is a great skill. So long as you don’t start to believe in the hallucination. For example, way back when I was in JHS, me and my buddies would play golf. There was a nine hole course next to our school, and it was cheap. Only about $5 for a round. We all had hand-me-down clubs. One particular hole always gave me trouble. Because you had to hit it over the water onto the green. Because I knew the water was there, it made me nervous, and I always hit the ball into the water. Until one day my friend gave me some a
  23. Once I was on this backpacking trip. We were going up over the first pass. If you’ve never been on a multi-day backpacking trip, the first day is always the hardest. You drive up as high as you can and park. Then you walk up and over a pretty high mountain range. Once you get on the other side of that first mountain range, that’s when the fun starts. You more or less walk flat (at least compared to the first day). Huge valleys, no people, meadows, streams, lakes filled with trout, wild animals, etc. It’s all very much worth the first day. And on thi
  24. One of the myths of NLP is in it’s most common name. “The Study Of Excellence.” The idea is you can find something that is “excellent.” Then you can study it. And if you study it well enough, you can recreate that excellence yourself. This is how NLP was created in the first place. By COPYING people who were ALREADY excellent communicators. But there are a couple problems with that. Imagine a regular mall. Imagine that mall over the course of about thirty years. Shops come and go. Some last longer than others. Trends change. Demo
  25. There’s an interesting theory from classical physics. Chaos theory. It basically says that while the laws of (classical) physics are deterministic, we can’t really predict very far into the future. An example is a two body problem vs. a three body problem. Two bodies is two simple masses in space orbiting around each other. Only those two, nothing else. With only those two, and the laws of gravity, you could take a snapshot at any given time, and using only their starting position, predict what they would look like WAY into the future. But with three bodies,
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