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Found 20 results

  1. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug24Post.mp4 Way back when I was in high school, I went through a rebellious phase. I was very anti-authority of any kind. One of my favorite quotes was from Johnny Rotten, the singer of the Sex Pistols. It wasn't really a quote, more of an opening line before the music started. It was on their cover of "Substitute," originally by The Who. The quote? "You don't need permission for anything..." A similar "truism" is that getting forgiveness is easier than getting permission. If you're a kid, you discover this over a
  2. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug22Post.mp4 Socrates and Marcus Aurelius were two different guys from two different times. One guy was a Greek philosopher. One guy was an orator and a Roman Emperor. But they both had the same idea about the human thought process. Socrates believed that everything everybody believed was wrong. And he could prove this. This is where they get the Socratic method from. By asking enough simple and well placed questions, it's very easy to PROVE that any idea anybody has is false. Of course, eventually Socrates started
  3. <iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug19Post.mp4"></iframe> https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug19Post.mp4 When I was a kid I was a huge fan of the Twilight Zone. Spooky stories with unexpected twists. One was kind of weird. A bunch of guys had this airplane that didn't fit anywhere. Nobody remembered anything, and they kept disappearing. But the crux of the whole episode was realizing that it wasn't true. Just some horrible imagination that became real. And it was proven to be false when on
  4. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug18APost.mp4 One of the primary assumptions in persuasion and influence is our logical minds aren't involved. This idea pops up in a lot of places with a lot of different descriptions. Cialdini showed we are influenced by things outside of our conscious awareness. If you've ever tried to use logic to get a girl or a guy to sleep with you, it probably didn't work. Logical arguments rarely work unless we are building rockets or doing brain surgery. Choosing movies, choosing dinner, choosing short term or long term romantic partner
  5. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug14APost.mp4 One thing our brain does very, very well is take shortcuts. Our brains are VERY fast, but that does come with a cost. All things come with a cost. The cost for how fast our brains are is how inaccurate they are. As much as we love thinking we are "right," most of the time, we aren't. One way to think about this that our brains aren't really "truth seeking entities," rather they are "perception chambers" that are more of a means to an end. In some ways, our lives are much less chaotic today than when our mind-bo
  6. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Aug13APost.mp4 The human mind is incredibly powerful. In many, many more ways that we'll probably ever understand. One way is how our memory works. Sure, for things like taking tests and remember names, our memory kind of sucks. But consider that it wasn't really meant to be a simple input-output device. It was meant to be a motivating device. A learning device. You saw somebody doing something, and you wanted to copy them. So you kept them memory as a guide, as you tried to get the same outcome. Since we're fo
  7. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/July31Post.mp4 Externalizing is a useful instinct. To blame things outside of ourselves for our failures. We can do an imaginary split test and see why. Imagine two hunters, going after two animals. Two different valleys, but otherwise the same. They both throw their spears and they both miss. The guy WITHOUT the externalizing instinct has a very OBJECTIVE description of what just happened. He realizes his spear throwing abilities are not what they could be. Sure, he'll still go after that animal. But he'll
  8. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/May07Post.mp4 One powerful yet somewhat confusing law of influence is the idea of comparison and contrast. When we look at any one thing, we look at it differently under various scenarios. When that "thing" is by itself, it's got a certain subjective value. When that "thing" is next to something else, it's got a completely different value. If you can strategically put the "thing" next to something, that "thing" will be perceived as have a MUCH higher value, that if that "thing" was all by itself. Marketers use this with profita
  9. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Apr19Post.mp4 All animals, including humans, are driven by instincts. William James, an old school psychologist from 100 years ago said humans have tons of instincts and tons of learning capability. Consider that these CAN be the same. One reason for our "self awareness" is we can use it to learn new instincts. To learn new things to the point of unconscious competence. Normally, when we talk about learning things to this point, we say things like "learning by heart." Or learning them until they become "second nature." T
  10. Invisible Violin Player: https://mindpersuasion.com/invisible-violin-player/ https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Feb22Loop.mp4 https://soundcloud.com/mindpersuasion/invisible-violinist
  11. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Nov27Post.mp4 I used to have this friend that liked doing magic tricks. It was his hobby. But not the tricks themselves, the actual performance of the tricks. Nowadays, with YouTube, there are plenty of people, who make plenty of money, doing tricks on camera. For those who are introverted, yet highly skilled in technical tricks, this is a dream come true. The more you practice, the more you learn, the more money you'll make. My friend told me he had a "magic demon" living inside him. Not really a demon, just a metaph
  12. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/Sept26Post.mp4 One of the hardest things to do as a human is to be responsible. The easiest thing to do in modern times is to find a reason, outside of yourself, for why you can't get what you want. Plenty of modern movements are centered around this common idea. It works like this. You've got somebody who wants something, but can't get. The first step is to externalize the problem. Something that worked fantastically in our ancient past. You throw a spear at an animal, and you miss. It's GOOD to get angry at the an
  13. https://loopvids.s3.amazonaws.com/July18Post.mp4 One very common metaphor when it comes to sales is to "sell the sizzle, not the steak." What does this mean? To appeal to people's emotions, rather than their logic. If you sell the steak, you can talk about where it came from. The kind of beef. How it was raised, what it was fed, etc. But when you sell the SIZZLE you sell how the product will be interpreted by the senses. That's because we humans are not nearly as logical as we'd like to believe. Sure, you may do some research on a product. Read
  14. Secrets of Unlimited Authority https://mindpersuasion.com/over-the-line/
  15. I had a friend once who bought a Volvo. This was about fifteen years or so ago. I don't remember the exact circumstances, but he had to special order it. It took about a month, then he and his wife had to drive to a nearby city (couple hours away) to pick it up. If you are a company that makes products, it's good to have products that are in such high demand, customers are willing to wait to get them. Sometimes this is normal, and not done to purposely increase sales. Building a car takes time, and if you build too many that you can't sell, that will end up costin
  16. There have been a lot of weird end-of-the-world cults. My favorite is a fictional one, from one of the Poltergeist movies. The fist movie was in a house that was on top of a cemetery. They'd moved the headstones, but not the bodies. (greedy real estate company) The second movie was something similar. Apparently a preacher (1800's or so) had collected a bunch of kids. Saying he was going to save them from the apocalypse. So he gathered them in some cave. Waiting for the end times. The date and went, but nothing happened. So the crazy old pr
  17. A very common idea in business is split testing. Even way before the internet, split testing was common. Markers know that if they want to get useful data, they need to do something other than ask people directly. Psychologists tell us that when we answer questions, we usually give answers that make us look good. Or if some marketing company is having some kind of focus group, they usually have to pay people. And since the person who is paying you is asking the questions, this also makes us give less than honest answers. But when they can set up situations where w
  18. The behavior of human structure is very easy to see in other people. We give somebody advice, and they say: "Yeah, easy for you to say!" But it's nearly impossible to see in ourselves. One way is to "go meta." Which means to purposely look at ourselves, and our behavior from a "higher' or more "objective" perspective. This is the kind of thing people learn in NLP seminars. But it's also something people do VERY naturally and EXTREMELY effectively. How? If you ever keep any record of any of your behavior, either before or after, you are going meta.
  19. One thing we humans always look for is safety. And one of the most common and instinctive ways of doing this is by finding safety in numbers. We generally don't feel comfortable doing anything unless we see other people going first. At the same time, we are hierarchical animals. Every time they test this, and every way they test this, it always comes out that way. Humans are self-organizing, hierarchical creatures. So are chimps. And the higher up a chimp is on the food chain, the more sex he gets. And the more bananas he gets. And since we also lin
  20. Most humans have a hard time thinking on their own. This isn't good or bad, this is just the way we are. Usually if we are in a situation, and something is a bit off, most people instinctively look around. Usually for somebody in charge. Or even a sign (put up by people in authority) that tells what to do. When they put strangers together, and give them a task, they always form a hierarchy. One guy in charge, and everybody else willingly following along. In the movies, like if people are stuck on an island or in an elevator, there's usually a struggle for pow
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